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Thatscricket - News - 'ICC need to substantiate allegations'

Published: Tuesday, January 23, 2001, 23:53 [IST]
 
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Auckland: Former New Zealand cricket captain Martin Crowe is willing to meet the International Cricket Council's (ICC) anti-corruption unit, his lawyer said on Tuesday.Cricket's match-fixing controversy flared again this week when Australian batsman Mark Waugh declined to be interviewed by the ICC inquiry team or submit to further questioning by Australian Cricket Board (ACB) investigator Greg Melick.ICC unit, headed by former Scotland Yard chief Sir Paul Condon, is investigating allegations that Waugh accepted more money than previously disclosed from Indian bookmaker Mukesh Gupta in return for Australian team information.One of the allegations in an Indian Cricket Board report also claims that Crowe received $ 45,000 from the bookmaker for information in 1992.Crowe has admitted receiving $ 7,500 for what he believed was a series of articles, but broke contact when he realised it was a scam involving a bookmaker. An Indian police report said the bookmaker stated Crowe refused to fix games.Crowe said he had been advised not to comment because he was involved in an inquiry by New Zealand Cricket's (NZC) investigative team of retired High Court judge Sir Ian Barker, Nick Davidson and assisting counsel Tim Gresson.Crowe's lawyer, David Howman, said he did not expect the ICC to put unsubstantiated allegations to Crowe. They would be "wasting their time" if they did not put forward anything more substantial than what had been alleged so far in India."You always go to meetings to see what people have to say," Howman said. We will co-operate with everybody, but what happens depends on what is put on the table. We have said all along that Martin acted properly."We have total faith in the integrity of the people conducting the NZC inquiry ... We haven't been given a timetable, which is a bit frustrating, but it's nothing we're worried about."

Copyright AFP 2000

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