हिन्दीಕನ್ನಡമലയാളംதமிழ்తెలుగు

Govt not to be dictated by board: Uma Bharathi

Published: Wednesday, April 25, 2001, 23:53 [IST]
 
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New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said.

New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said.

New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said.

New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said. New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said.
New Delhi: The Indian government reacted angrily on Wednesday to a threat by the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) to pull out of major tournaments, including the 2003 World Cup, unless New Delhi clarifies its stand on playing Pakistan. "The government's policy of not playing Pakistan in the present circumstances is a final one," Sports Minister Uma Bharti told reporters. "India's self-respect and prestige, which are more important than everything else, will not be compromised," she said. "The government takes foreign policy decisions keeping in mind national interests. The Board has no business to dictate policies to us." The Board of Control for Cricket in India had on Tuesday threatened to pull out of all major international tournaments until the government came out with clear policy guidelines on matches with Pakistan. "We have asked the government for clarification on the matter and will not participate in events other than bilateral or tri-nation series, till then," said BCCI president, A C Muthiah. The decision would affect India's participation in tournaments such as the Asia Cup in Pakistan in December, the ICC Knock Out tournament in India next year and the World Cup in South Africa in 2003. The tension between the BCCI and New Delhi has been growing since last month when the government directed the board not to send the Indian team to play in tournaments in Sharjah, Singapore and Toronto - where Pakistan would also have been playing. A political dialogue between India and Pakistan has been frozen since the two South Asian rivals fought a short but bloody border conflict in 1999. "The time is not yet ripe for resuming bilateral cricketing relations with Pakistan," Bharti said. "Cricket is not just an ordinary game. It is extraordinary in that it is an expression of national sentiment." However, Bharti did try to clarify what the BCCI was supposed to do if it was drawn to play Pakistan in a competition like the World Cup. "Our stand is clear ... if such an unavoidable situation arises, India will go ahead and play. We are only against a planned bilateral cricket series against Pakistan. "If the BCCI says it is not going to participate in World Cup or any other tournament it's their headache," she said.

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