हिन्दीಕನ್ನಡമലയാളംதமிழ்తెలుగు

Pak opts for green top for rest of the series

Published: Thursday, April 1, 2004, 21:48 [IST]
 
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Multan:Defeated on a placid track, Pakistan has now decided to go for green top wickets in the remaining two Tests at Lahore and Rawalpindi in a bid to bounce back in the series.

Coach Javed Miandad said after his team's defeat that he has full faith that his fast bowlers would click in the remaining Test and for that purpose, they would have to be given suitable wickets.

Former Pakistan great Imran Khan also advocated green tops at Lahore and Rawalpindi saying that the home side should play to its strength, which was fast bowling.

He conceded that such a strategy may back fire if Indian seamers knocked out Pakistanis but said that there was no option for Pakistan but to take that risk.

"We need a good wicket where our bowlers can get some help. We still have a good attack. India have the best batting line-up and once they click it is really difficult to stop them. So, we will be looking for a track that suit our bowlers," Miandad said after his team's humiliating defeat.

Imran Khan said, "Pakistan's domestic cricket has a poor structure and is very weak. A player will have to make huge jump when he goes on to play international cricket. "They have no choice but to produce a green top which would give as much help to the bowlers."

Imran Khan said Pakistan did not have enough back up players to replace any in the current team. He said the selectors should pick players who had 'brave-heart' and could withstand the pressures of a Indo-Pak match, but warned against making wholesale changes.

"I would pick an additional specialist batsman, either Misbah-ul-Haq or Younis Khan. They are determined players, gutsy players. In this sort of situation, you need not just talent but heart to take in the pressure.

"Saqlain also did not look very confident. Danish Kaneria might be a good choice, the Indians have not seen him before. "But it is a tricky thing. Making wholesale changes is a recipe for disaster," he said.

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